News

Eagles’ ‘Hotel California’ made into world’s largest record

Eagles’ ‘Hotel California’ made into world’s largest record

'HOTEL CALIFORNIA:' This 1977 photo shows the Eagles, from left, drummer Don Henly, guitarist Joe Walsh, bass Randy Meisner, and guitarists Glenn Frey and Don Felder. Photo: Associated Press

A replica of the Eagles’ iconic album “Hotel California” has been made into the “world’s largest record” and placed on the roof of Los Angeles’ fabled Forum venue to celebrate its reopening.

The music icons’ 1977 album has sold over 32 million copies worldwide and now it has come back to life with a vinyl recreation that now stands atop the California landmark.

The replica spans 5.7 acres, 407 feet in diameter, and even spins at 17 miles per hours – but does not actually play music.

The stunt is to celebrate the reopening of the Los Angeles venue, which will feature a run of six shows by the Eagles later this month.

The group is no stranger to the Forum – Don Henley and his band played back-to-back shows there in 1975, 1976 and 1979, and the bandmates returned to the venue in 2009 to rehearse for their Long Road Out of Eden tour.

Recent Headlines

in Local

Sheriff’s offices say they won’t hold people just to check immigration status

prison

NYCLU and NYS Sheriffs' Association recommended that practice of honoring federal "detainers" be stopped

in Local

Cuomo administration responds to second Times report

cuomo

Statement says "relevant parties" were contacted about inaccuracies in reports critical of Cuomo administration

in National

Divided House abandons vote on border bill

immigration

Congress will take a five-week vacation without addressing the immigration crisis.

in Sports

Ravens’ Rice publicly apologizes to wife for domestic violence

rayrice

The running back apologizes to his wife for hitting her, vowing to be an "ambassador against domestic violence."

in Local

Project official: Ithaca Commons rebuild will wrap up in early 2015

commons

Project manager for Commons rebuild says summer delays were one reason for extension of project initially proposed to take two years to finish