News

New York faces final decisions on medical marijuana, higher minimum wage

New York faces final decisions on medical marijuana, higher minimum wage

Photo: WHCU

The fate of medical marijuana, a higher minimum wage and efforts to combat heroin addiction are set to be decided as New York lawmakers enter their final week of work during this year’s regular session.

Legislators will return to Albany on Monday and are expected to consider hundreds of bills before Thursday’s planned adjournment.

One high-profile bill would raise the starting wage from $8 to $10.10 and let cities like New York City set a local minimum wage of up to $13.13 an hour.

Supporters of medical marijuana hope to secure a deal with Gov. Andrew Cuomo and for top lawmakers to clear the way for passage.

Finally, lawmakers hope to pass legislation to combat opiate addiction, though some say they’re wary of proposals to strengthen criminal drug penalties.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Recent Headlines

in Local

Lifton weighs in on end of legislative session

Fresh
State Assemblywoman Barbara Lifton [D-Ithaca] speaking at a Cortlandville Town Hall in 2013.

Ithaca's assemblywoman said some progress was made, but many important items fell by the wayside.

in Sports

Serena downs Venus to reach Wimbledon quarters

Fresh
serenawimbledon

A contest featuring the sisters, who between them have hoisted the Rosewater Dish 10 times, should have been a blockbuster but turned out to be yet another awkward anti-climax.

in Local

Deadline looms for Southern Tier casino license

casino

As of Monday, only one application has been submitted for a casino license from the state.

in Local

Cornell scientists develop models for Earth-like planets

Local_News41-620x400

Scientists say the models can help them project how life could have developed on planets both far away and closer to home.

in National

Postal carriers getting a panic button

10-overlay3

It used to be that mail carriers had to just contend with dogs and weather but a rise in other work-related dangers has pushed the postal service to adopt new technology.