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University of Pennsylvania researchers working on cancer-sniffing dogs

University of Pennsylvania researchers working on cancer-sniffing dogs

Here’s one more reason to love your dog.

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania are delving into the concept of cancer-sniffing dogs.

They’re basing their study on the premise that dogs have the ability to detect changes in their owners.

Doctor Cindy Otto is the director of the Working Dog Center in the at the University of Pennsylvania. She is working to detect cancer in humans with the use of dogs called Super Sniffers.

Specifically, Otto is studying whether dogs can detect ovarian cancer, the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women.

She says dogs’ noses have millions more odor detectors than humans.

“The amount of odor from a cancer sample is very, very small. Then it gets diluted into the blood, so what we’re looking for are the super sniffers,” Otto said.

Tissue and blood samples from both healthy patients and ovarian cancer patients are being collected as part of the study.

Otto says the goal is to develop a new system of screening for ovarian cancer, and help decrease future cancer deaths.

 

 

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