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No-fracking groups pan NY liquid natural gas plan

No-fracking groups pan NY liquid natural gas plan

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Environmental groups are criticizing the state Department of Environmental Conservation’s proposed regulations for liquefied natural gas facilities, saying they’re too vague and lack an evaluation of environmental risks.

At a hearing in Albany Wednesday, DEC officials say the regulations stem from a growing demand for fueling stations for LNG-powered trucks. New York is the only state that bans LNG facilities, with a moratorium imposed after an LNG storage tank explosion in 1973.

Sandra Steingraber, a leader of New Yorkers Against Fracking, says the eight pages of regulations are focused mainly on fire safety. She says issues including air emissions and the impact of heavy trucks on highways need consideration.

Russ Haven of the New York Public Interest Research Group says if the regulations are intended for truck-fueling stations, they should be rewritten to exclude larger plants.

 

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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