Local

Human remains allowed in pet cemeteries under new state rules

Human remains allowed in pet cemeteries under new state rules

New regulations will allow New York animal lovers to spend eternity with their pets.

The Daily News reports that officials have finalized rules allowing pet cemeteries to accept the cremated remains of humans.

The cemeteries can bury pet owners’ ashes as long as they don’t charge a fee for it and don’t advertise human burial services.

New York’s Division of Cemeteries put a halt to human burials at pet cemeteries in 2011 after an Associated Press story about the practice. It later relaxed the ban on a limited basis and began working on permanent rules.

Ed Martin, owner of the 117-year-old Hartsdale Pet Cemetery in Westchester County, says he gets five or six requests a year from humans who want to have their ashes buried with their pets.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

More Local Headlines

in Local

Electronic parking meters coming to Ithaca city streets

The City of Ithaca announced Thursday that it will enhance its parking enforcement program through the use of two new LIcense Plate Readers, which have been installed in the Community Service Officer vehicles.

The city will also start charging a $1.50 an hour for on-street parking, an increase of fifty cents.

in Local

Cuomo: Washington should consider Ebola travel ban

Gov. Andrew Cuomo spoke with "CBS This Morning" co-anchor Charlie Rose  about his new book and the state's response to the Ebola threat

Earlier this month, Cuomo said a ban wouldn't be effective.

in Local

New York preparing Ebola waste plan

ebolanurse-620x400

Preparations continue for any potential cases of Ebola that may hit New York State.

in Local

Deputies: Seneca County man threatened to shoot officers

crime

Deputies say man became belligerent, then made threat against officers

in Local

Report: Over 34,000 New Yorkers deemed unable to have gun

Local_News41-620x400

Classification comes due to mental health concerns, measures implemented under New York's SAFE Act